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of the black, white, and multiracial ancestors of michelle obama." it airs next and is about 45 minutes. >> good morning. or is busy in texas, hi, y'all. it is a great day to be innd austin, texas and today had thea honor pleasure to be at the texas book festival serving as your moderator for "new york times" writer and author, raches swarns. i am going to tell you just a few things about rachel because i know you came to hear her ande not me and because our time is n limited.d she has worked for "the new york times" since 1995, reporting on domestic policy, national politics, immigration, the presidential campaign of 2004 n 2008 and our first lady, michelle obama and her role in the obama white house. i met rachel at a very different event this year, where i bought a book, the book she wrote, "american tapestry: the story of the black, white, and multiracial ancestors of michelle obama". after hearing her talk, i bought six more copies. i bought them from my family members to give as christmasrisa gifts. after having read her book i ca tell you it was a goodha investment. it taught me
. and last week alone we saw it from colin powell, brian williams and president obama himself. colin powell went on the sunday show talking about the dark vein of intolerance that was running throughout the republican party. what evidence did he provide for that assertion? we are not left wing. we don't believe in anthropogenic climate change or we don't believe there should be redistribution of wealth or we don't believe in obamacare. if we would just move to the left that would make us not racist. colin powell above all should know how not raise our party is considering selling in our party were considering supporting him despite his liberalism in 1996 for presidential run and secretary of state under president bush obviously, somebody who is treated well by the republican party but that didn't stop him anyway because now colin powell is on the left and that means we are the bad guys. president obama did in his inaugural address just last week also, there's a peculiar line in his speech where he said absolutism is not printable and name calling is not discussion. he then proceeded to spen
. a granular level in which the attitude from the obama administration has been we love the institution. we have got our own sort of thing going on. i think it's a very open question at this point. which of the two ambassadors by implications, which of the two administrations is actually sized up and sorted of priced the u.n. more accurately. the one that engages with it in order to sort of really make sure that it doesn't do anything the u.s. doesn't like or one which apparently on the surface has more love for it. at the same time it's disengaged. it's not fair for ambassador rice. her engagement is where it should be. she's living day and night in the accident occurty council that's where she should be. i think that those probably warfare criticism during the first two to three years of the first barack obama term. >> host: when has the u.s. sought u.n. legitimacy? >> guest: most of the time as a per let to actions that it was planning on taking anyway. so in iraq, we saw legitimacy for something the entire world knew we were going do no matter what. i would say that the u.s. seeks a les
and president obama himself. colin powell went on the sunday shows and talk drop the so-called dark vein of intolerance that was running throughout the republican party. what evidence did he provide? that we are not left wing, that we don't believe in anthropogenic climate change or we don't believe that there should be redistribution of wealth so we don't believe in obamacare. if we would just move to let suddenly that would make is not racist. now, he should know how not racist our party is considering so many in our party were considering supporting and despite his liberalism, and he was secretary of state under president bush obviously. somebody treated very well by the republican party, but that did not stop him because now he's on the left which means that we had the bad guys. president obama did it in his inaugural address just last week also. he said a peculiar line in his speech very said that absolutism is not principal and he said that name-calling is not discussion. he then proceeded to read avoid principal and be an absolutist and suggest that essentially if you disagree wit
of american life. we saw it from colin powell, brian williams and president obama himself. colin powell went on the sunday shows and talked about the so-called dark vein of intolerance that was running throughout the republican party. now, what evidence did he provide for that assertion? that we're not left wing, that we don't believe in climate change or that we don't believe in redistribution of wealth or that we don't believe in obamacare, and if we would just move to the left, suddenly that would make us not racist. now, colin powell above all should know how not racist our party is considering how much of our party were willing to support him in 1996. this is somebody who's treated very well by the republican party. now colin powell is on the left, and that means that we are the bad guys. president obama did it in his inaugural address just last week also. he said there was a peculiar line in his speech where he said absolutism is not principle, and he said that name calling is not discussion. he then proceeded to spend the rest of his speech name calling and avoiding principle and bein
when he was nominated to be the cia director. and as an obama supporter of course i was shocked to find out who was crowned be kept on as obama secretary of defense but when he told people i found interesting and was the major reason i wanted to write this book and what he said was we are moving towards a smaller military that will do fewer things and be able to go fewer places which he felt was a terrible thing and he added i don't want to be a part of that kind of system that is going to retrench. my feeling has been we need a smaller military that will do fewer things and go to fewer places. so that is the kind of book i wanted to write. i thought that i should do it even though others have really had ma named a lot of this. i am sure you are familiar with the work of d-nd for example, who wrote things such as the american empire and years before that, john neuhaus, one of my favorite writers wrote in imperial america and other books have dealt with this with an unusual background in the sense that i spent 42 years in the government and the state department, defense department and th
follow closely. he was nominated to be the cia director in 1991, and as an obama supporter, i was shocked to find out that he was going to be kept on as the secretary of defense. what he told people, i found, and it was a major reasoning for why i wanted to write this book, what he said is that we are moving towards a smaller military. one that will do fewer things than be able to go fewer places, which he thought was a terrible thing and he added that he didn't want to be a part of that kind of a system that is going to retrench. my feeling has always been that we need a smaller military that will do fewer things and go to fewer places. so that is the kind of book that i wanted to write. i thought that i should do it even though others have mined a lot of this. i'm sure a lot of you are familiar with the works who wrote things like the american empire and 10 years before that, john neuhaus, one of my favorite new york writers, wrote imperial america. other books have dealt with this. the background and ascends, i have spent 42 years in the government beyond the state department, defense
in. obama unfortunately comes in with very little background on foreign policy never paid much attention, is served in washington only two years i was enthusiastic supporter but those of us that looked at him knew it could be a problem and when he appointed secretary of state and secretary of defense for domestic reasons and appointed retired marine general as a national security adviser and put leon panetta, know he is a neighbor in california but captured by the mentality of the cia this was an extremely weak national security team and obama also was ruled by the military that is how you got the search of forces and i think he realizes he was had and that is important why i am a little more optimistic with the second turn this is a wiser man and with the the fact he ended the war in iraq and meandering toward the war in afghanistan allowing the of pentagon, an institution of the fine motor skills of a dinosaur takes them a long time to put something together for withdrawal. all obama has to do is look at gorbachev. he came 1985, a secret speech 1986 denouncing afghanistan, he
. i am condensing but he creates miracles and iraq may be afghanistan. obama as an experiment bought onto it with their counter insurgency strategy. the problem is remember the book i mentioned the trade is and others are consulting regularly, it is a good book but there is one chapter called conditions for a successful insurgency that might make an effort to ground and they include a corrupt central government, a largely illiterate role population, now minister rein, a neighboring state that is used as a sanctuary sanctuary, it is a description of afghanistan. to be then drop a diagram of the typography of what it would look like you could do the overlay so he knows going in this is extremely long odds that bass. in iraq top commander, it was the third tour of duty. he brings the same on dryish, and it is common to all of us look at the prism of what we know. he had power point* slides afghanistan is not iraq. i interviewed well over 100 people and they said a problem came up he would say in and bar we did this are we solved the problem this way when time in a meeting with president
, you did have this backlash against the government in general, against president obama, present bush left office shortly after they started. against the democratic party more generally, against the federal reserve. against keynesian economics, i am prepared to defend if anyone would like to ask about that. this was encapsulated to me by two events that kind of book ended the backlash period. my favorite cartoon from the crisis appeared in the new yorker around march of 2009, i think. and it showed a page that was set in medieval courtyard, and the king's head is on the chopping block. the page runs in and says, government is part of the solution, not part of the problem. and that lasted about two or three months. after that, people started thinking that the government was part of the problem. when it's book ended, it was appended with the 2010 elections. which is really angry at him cummins, people that voted for t.a.r.p. and it resulted in the biggest turn of the republican party ever. it was this angle that i was talking about. as i take a few more minutes, is that okay? okay. very
the system. we run a risk in deciding if the obama administration has been tempted to say we don't want to be the hegemonic provider of security at these public goods to the world. let this be another big player at the u.n., but another belly up to the bar player at the u.n. in turtle bay. let's let the collector worry about it. they will worry about it and waste damaging to us. the most important thing is that the u.s. doesn't understand a guarantee system as an act or from the outside, the consequences going to be a scramble among scared and worried racing great powers who we all should fear we come to in south china sea. post rss if you were the last two u.s. ambassadors to the u.n. >> host: the last two ambassadors. well, here's the thing. john bolton was excoriated as someone who despise the u.n. that you could chop off the top seven or 10 stories that no one would ever notice there at its headquarters. >> host: do you agree with that statement? >> guest: i agree about 80%. as somebody said, i've actually found found it quite conciliatory and the message is american liberals need t
of the obama administration which did, in fact, raise the deficit. we all know that deficits are bad things. bigger deaf sets are -- deficits are bad, other things equal, but other things were not remotely close, and there was a cogent rationale for a stimulus package of that size and maybe even for a bigger one. the biggest message of the book to me as the author is this paradox that there were massive government interventions induced and caused by the fact that the private markets ran amok. the private markets that went off the track, the government came in not perfectly, but pretty effectively to try to put things back on track. and yet at the end of the day we witnessed -- and you've all witnessed it as i have -- this quite sharp backlash against, quote, big government in the united states. now, americans have never liked big government. you call anything big government, and americans will be against it reflexively. but there was a reason for the government interventions. it was a market failure in the financial world the likes of which we've not seen since the 1930s. and if we had done
this in afghanistan, too. and obama at least as an experiment bought onto the idea okay, let's do a surge in afghanistan at least a partial counters urgency strategy. let's see how it works. -- counterinsurgency strategy. the problem is well, remember the book, the book i mentioned which petraeus and others are consulting regularly. it's a very good book. there was one chapter in that book called conditions for a successful insurgency. where he lists specific characteristics of a country that might make it just really fertile ground for successful insurgency. they included a very corrupt central government, and largely illiterate rural population, mountainous terrain along the borders. a neighboring state that issues as sanctuary by the insurgents. you just go down the list, it's a description of afghanistan. he even draws a diagram of what the topography of this ideal insurgent territory would look like. you can do an overlay of this diagram with a map of afghanistan. so he knows going in that this really is extremely long odds at this. when he was in iraq, when he was top commander, tha
decade. obama unfortunately comes in with very little background of foreign policy, never paid much attention, served in washington only two years. i was a very enthusiastic supporter of obama and remain but we new national security could be a problem. and appointed as secretary of state and secretary of defense and a retired marine general for domestic reasons and he lasted one year and putting in leon panetta and know he is your neighbor in california but captured by the mentality of the cia. this was an extremely weak national security team. obama also was ruled by the military that is how you got the surge of forces. i think he realizes he was had and that is important and why i am optimistic about the second term this is a wiser man with foreign policy but he has ended the war in iraq meandering to ending the war in afghanistan and allowing the pentagon with the motor skills of a dinosaur such as a timetable for withdrawal all obama has to do i look at the gorbachev experience, and came in 1985, gave a secret speech 1986 faugh denouncing afghanistan, had told shultz we are gett
the bush stimulus and the obama's stimulus program. troubled asset relief program, fannie, freddie, and the economic downturn. you can still make this out, and you can see from where we are today in 2013, the time this was put together, the single biggest factor in the annual deficits that we will experience of the next several years was not from the economic slowdown, but it was because of the revenues that were taken away by the bush tax cuts. now, we all know now because of the legislation that was just passed, some portion of that tax revenue that has been shown on this chart is being lost will be recovered because at least for upper-income taxpayers they're going to go back to clinton-era tax rates. but the point in trying to make with this one chart, this is the real world. the idea that tax cuts pay for themselves is not the real world. when one side believes one thing in one side believes the other, there is not much room for consequence. i will come back to white, and they should be part of how you think about this. why is it that the two sides believe such different thing
stimulus and obama stimulus program and the economic downturn, you can still make it out and you can see from where we are today in 2013 at the time this was put together the single biggest factor in the annual deficits that we will experience over the next several years, not from the economic slowdown but because of the revenues that were taken away by the bush tax cuts. as we all know now because of the legislation, some portion of that tax revenue is shown on this chart as being lost will be recovered because proper income tax payers, they're going to go back to the clinton era tax relief. the point i am trying to make with this one chart, this is the real world and the idea tax cuts favored themselves is not the real world and when one side believes one thing and one side believes the other there's not much room for a consequence. i will come back to why and this should be how you think about this one. why is it that the two sides believed such different things? why does one depend on evidence and the other depend more on broad principles about the size of government and individual l
need to have a vague understanding of why the federal reserve did what it did and the obama administration did raise the deficit, bigger deficits are bad but there was a rationale for a stimulus package. but the biggest message of the book to me as the author is a paradox of the private markets ran amok but pretty effectively to put things back on track but at the end of the day you witnessed a sharp backlash you call it a big government americans are against it. but there was a reason for the government intervention the likes we have not seen since the 1930's and it would have been a preview. nonetheless you did have a backlash against the government in general, president obama, it would have been against him him, against a democratic party more generally, the federal reserve, keynesian economics which i am perfect -- prepared to defend. but what both ended the of backlash period but my favorite cartoon from the crisis appears in "the new yorker" march 2009 and it shows a page set in in medieval castle courtyard and the king said is on the chopping block. wait stop governme
everyone wants to know is how does our present president, president obama, what has he done? he has done a couple interesting ones. shovel ready is really his. hard to find that anywhere. the first t.a.r.p. we got shovel ready. snowmageddon is his. that was a totally spontaneous 2011 monster storm that came through, leaves the white house and gets, everything shutdown, he gets to the hilton hotel, this is snowmageddon. in 2011 he used the term sputnik moment. in his state of the union special saying this country needed a challenge, and outside moment that would generate our interest in research and development and education as had the sputnik launch in 1957. to a younger generation, sputnik is probably not as big a thing as it is to an older generation but that was pretty clever but most of his slogans, most of his abilities have not really caught on. another one he came up with, he was in washington and he said it is a strange construct but in august, this is the time when washington, things are hard to get done. nobody knows what that means but somehow is applicable. on that low note,
president obama's second inauguration and that is where has the obama administration been on this? is a lot of the cases are before 2008. has anything changed? >> the terrorism operations the developed under george w. bush, and they have basically continued unabated under president obama. and i think one of the extraordinary things is if you look at the 2012 presidential election, one of the areas was national security and foreign policy, the glass jar of democratic candidates and what he is seen as a doubling down on the police. eric holder can to san francisco for a meeting that was put on and he was questioned specifically about the sting operations and he insisted that the these are a legitimate law enforcement tool for binding terrorists. but we've also seen under obama and by the press to be critical of this is an increasing of surveillance. the amount of warrantless wiretaps, warrantless electronic surveillance. the fbi when it believes someone might has 72 hours looking through e-mail and trash to go through any kind of digital remnants he might leave behind looking for evidence tha
with emerson's and which now the obama administration is trying to take a step further. the clinton administration privatized this in the processing, animals are slaughtered and another step where they are cut up and processed so in the reprocessing there has been the privatized system that we have done a lot of work showing how dangerous it is. the obama administration wants to increase this program especially for poultry. it would mean more than 200 birds a minute are being slaughtered in a plant. that is not a misstatement. 200 birds a minute. there is no way there can be any inspection of these carcasses and these are immigrant workers, extremely dangerous work. imagine both hands get sliced. all sorts of horrible injuries and because of all the contamination from salmonella you can never eat another piece of chicken. they get the chicken into chemicals, things like corn and sodium phosphate. that really over originated with the corn -- the clinton administration. a lengthy answer. i don't know how much time we have. >> what is the mandate of the usda? where did go wrong and wha
that obama's speechwriter has decided to come come -- become a screenwriter so a screenwriter can you do, obama's speech writer for a change? >> i don't think i would make a good speechwriter. there are requirements to that job like patients and willing to be severely edited and writing on deadline so i would not be -- >> you up with some wonderful words into lincoln. >> i did my best but as i said before i think we have a president who is really capable of writing very beautiful speeches all on his own and a couple of really wonderful book so it's nice to have a real writer back in the white house. >> just another screenwriter coming out though. cd maybe when he stunned being president he will become a screenwriter. >> i am available to be either a presidential speechwriter or a screenwriter. >> tell us about your relationship with steven spielberg and how a film and he was a screenwriter, the third one in movies and how did it change from what spielberg was doing in the first place and what he asked you to do? >> steven originally was thinking of this being a general film about the civ
had inauguration this week. barack obama, january 19, 2013. this very month is full of epic anniversary, regarding race and american history. it's 150 years ago since the emancipation proclamation by lincoln which is now popularized in the story of the 13th amendment just two januaries later in 1865 in the spielberg film nominated for the academy award. we're getting a sense of that history. more pert innocent for us, 150 years, 2013, to get a sense of how tricky this history has been, i want you to think about the 50-year anniversary. fifty years ago this january, in january 1963, i was getting my driver's license. that was a big deal. martin luther king was resolved to go into birmingham. this month, he decided, and he didn't tell his father or tell his board members because he knew they would try to stop him. what he said was, after eight years since the brown decision, the forces defending segregation mobilized across the segregated states than the forces of freedom, and we're about to lose our window in history, and if i don't take the more risk that i have the way thes
, the obama administration decided to reassign those defendants to a military commission at guantanamo bay. but through that monthslong controversy there wasn't much exploration of what a military commission at guantanamo bay actually is. the debate pretty much, pretty much, pretty much boiled down to military courts are tough, civilian courts presumably are weaker, and given a choice about who you'd want to deal with alleged terrorists and enemies of the united states, well, it seems like you'd want the tough guys to deal with them. and there was not a lot of discussion about what military commissions are, how they operate, who runs them, those sorts of questions which i think are important for americans to consider when deciding whether this is an experiment that we want to continue or expand or at or drop in the years going forward. so this book is really a story of the development of this project as told through the, a number of vims involved in it -- individuals involved in it, people some who were policymakers at very high levels of government, some are judges. but mainly it's about
they did, is that from frederick douglass to martin luther king to barack obama today, that magnificent progress that's going forward, we change, we are more accepting, we have a lot more blessing, we have a black man in the white house, but the acceptance and public culture of barack obama by the millions of white people who voted for him is still largely on their terms, not his. it's the people on the other side who are forced to accommodate across the lines, force always black folks have had -- it's not a choice and luxury to do with race. including barack obama who can't talk about race right now because if he does, the people who voted for him will find some reason to say that he is emphasizing too much. so race is still there. a place, it can pay enormous dividends in our future. to me, it is vital we get our sense of history more in line with what happened so we can restore our confidence and capacities of government to move forward. and i'm not saying it's going to be easy, but i think that it's beginning to have -- we have five years of anniversaries of things that are great bl
in 2004 and by the way have you changed any of your views since the election of barack obama? >> guest: i remember my mother when he was nominated, hazel and khalia and i were in montrÉal. she called me at the hotel. she was i think 93 then. she said, and she was crying. [inaudible] i didn't need that telling. i always knew this. america is many places. it is a place that can be tolerant and accepting, a place where views can be moderated and differences can be reconciled. and i think a good deal of america supported vigorously the candidacy of a rock obama. and it's not only important to the black community. it's important to other americans as well. but he still faces a sort of vicious kind of ridicule from certain borders that are not unlike the america we saw when i was young in richmond, virginia. but, i think there are several americans -- i had grown tired of at least one of them. >> host: and "quitting america" you wrote america never helps anyone, even the starving and list its proposed to an american interest either strategic or economic and one cannot always distinguish one fr
. obviously we are. there's to many things that happen. even the presence of obama in the white house itself raises racial questions for some people said that while we may be on the way some day to be post-racial, i think it is fair to say that we are not now. >> host: do have a relationship obama? >> guest: not really, no. >> host: "and justice for all," her most recent book, professor at the university of pennsylvania, former chairwoman of the u.s. commission on civil rights. here is a history of the u.s. commission on civil rights. mary frances berry on booktv on c-span 2. >> i'm sure you're more familiar with malcolm knox. at that time, he was always supposedly the man in favor of violence. that wasn't the issue. he did support the right of armed self-defense, but he didn't promote progressive violence. malcolm x said power against power. we are not going to convince the right segregationists to accept. we have to build our own four saves until they have no choice but to recognize their demands and that's power. and he called this black nationalism. he built a whole ideology about it. th
england. in today's world of president obama goes to hawaii for four five days everybody goes crazy. >> churchill took his staff with him. when president obama goes there is no danger in the way there was danger in december of 41. >> just a comment. i was reading it and getting upset about how much they were eating and he had access to but you end the book with the rationing so it redeemed him. i was glad you put that there by which was earlier sudden get upset all the time. that was good. >> it was an important chapter. showed a part of churchill's character that was very important. many other people have in common. any other questions? >> churchill was known for being a poor money manager. all of the menuses and and food that he bought a, did you find bills that he paid for everything? he was famous for not paying for food and various other things in his life. >> i don't know about soups but most of the bills that i have seen and i have seen many of them are stamped paid. for instance all of the important in is that he had for his son's 20 first birthday, they were paid. i am not
that has upset and has really agitated people. >> host: ambassador, you talk about president obama having a -- of drones sunny these are the reports published about the relationship with president obama and the drones. the rolling stone article says, -- i would have thought this temperment -- a camp passion not man i would have thought he would handle it differently but the use of drone has gone up exponentially and the impact on both societies has been devastating. so, some way we need to connect the dots, some way we need to say people who are pressing the button in the midwest or far west in the united states, and across the world. entire families and communities and women and children, people going to a funeral, people going to wedding party, are being blown up, and then here we sit, collateral damage, there nor civilians being killed. we need to connect these two very different worlds and see ultimately, is that what we, the united states of america, stand for? is that what we're exporting to the world? >> host: how do we connect with that in your view? sunny think the debate has to
's world, the president obama goes over to hawaii for four or five days. everybody goes crazy. >> well, when president obama -- [inaudible] in that trip that they took in december. [inaudible] >> yes? >> it's not a question, but just a comment. i was reading about how much they were eating, and he had access with the rationing. so it redeemed him. i'm glad you put that there. but i kind of wish it was earlier so that i didn't get upset all the time. [laughter] >> yes, it was an important chapter. it showed a part of his character that was very important. as many other people have this in common. >> yes? >> he was known for being a poor money manager. all of the menus that he planned in the food that he thought, did he find bills that he actually paid for everything? most of those i have seen are stamped paid. >> yes, they are stamped paid and all of the important it is that he had -- i'm not quite sure when the dinner was someone was paid. you bring up an interesting point. but they are all stamped as paid. all of the bills are saved. not just a few of them. there are hundreds of them.
say it was president obama in his first term, he said: i am here because you all marched. not in america yet 50 years ago what did i think america was? it was all things to me. my husband's home country, my new jewish family -- [inaudible] robin and benjamin, leonard's cousins, and lots of americans. we came here from amsterdam to photograph the black people. i have no photo of myself and our seven month stay in -- [inaudible] leonard was very frugal. he needed all film for his project, "black and white america." nothing but racists, he said. i wish i had a picture of myself and of leonard at the march on washington. i only had my eyes. and these eyes looked and looked and looked. i would say all these places. and when leonard asked me how i liked the day, i would say all these faces, the day of the march was america for me. and then the speech of dr. martin king, ruth -- luther king, "i have a dream." the speech was in the air. it moved like a wave over the heads of all those people. the voice was strong, a preacher's voice. it reached everyone. i had never heard anythin
and recognizable from the bush administration and the obama administration that peace keeping operations with the u.n. for all of the problems the scandals and sexual -- scandals of ripping off the organization all adds up. there's a value being provided by peace keeping operations thatter relaceble to the united states. we will see this one when it comes to mali and other places where we're looking to them to perform jobs we can't do. >> host: what is the u.s. influence in the u.n.? >> guest: it's large in one sense and in another sense is not. the key factor, it's a key point about the book, i've been talking almost exclusively about the u.n. and the u.s.' relation to it as a play within the u.n. system. the biggest player of the super power, all of those things are true. the most important relationship that the u.s. has to the u.n. is not actually as being the biggest player within the u.n. system. it's rather that the united states operates in effect the parallel system of international order or security also economic which the u.s. provides vast amounts of public goods to the world that are co
just didn't explore that room back in 2008, way before the obama crowd took over, let's be clear. [applause] >> discuss the research and decisions made in the creation of the film script. they're joined in conversation we daniel wineberg, opener of the abraham book shop in shop. >> welcome to virtual book signing, we're in the abraham book shop in chicago. it's gorgeous day. we have a few people here with us and we're happy to have c-span join us. thank you very much to be here, and illinois channel is here and liz daryl from the tribune, literary book section, is with us, and we appreciate all of them being here, also voice of america is covering us today as well. just before we go on, should tell you all that while we're live -- and this is not for c-span unfortunately but while we're live you can e-mail in questions. we hope you will. give your first name and where you're from and we'll shout out and try to get it on air as quakily as we can. if you're watching the archives you can always ask us if we have signed books or leftovers. don't want to be with the screen play of the
obama done enough in regards to environmental regulation legislation speak with president obama has worked very hard to make progress, but there's a lot more left to be done to a couple of quick examples the president obama worked hard with the automakers to double the fuel efficiency of our cars by 2025. that is going to save consumers $100 billion a year at the pump. is going to cut our carbon emissions from automobiles and have. that's good progress. but an opportunity house for a second term is to go ahead and reduce the carbon from our single largest source, which is coal-fired power plants. we need to reduce those carbon emissions, and the epa is positioned now to issue new standards that can make a lot of progress. we all need to support it spent you wrote about the 2010 house of representatives, and as you know the 2012 house of representatives doesn't look very different. what do you think? >> it's fundamentally unchanged the complexion but we hope that republicans and democrats alike will reach across the, find common ground around ways to go after climate change, for exam
obama's inaugural address, i heard echoes of king's speech i have a dream. and when i turn off my television set, i spent a few minutes reflecting on the question are all of us truly welcome to share in this dream come the same dream that dr. king dreamed? most americans i am sure can be cite portions of dr. king's i have a dream speech by heart. it's an extraordinary and very familiar speech i've grown accustomed to hearing clips of his speech played over and over are cycled over and over on the radio every january. they are the favorite quotes, the favorite lines. and now that i have school-age children i see how king has explained to them in classrooms when i was in elementary school there was no martin luther king day, no discussion of his heroism in the classrooms but when my children came home from school just the other day, they told me all they had learned in school about his courage. she was the man who stood up to the police who believed the children of all colors and walks of life ought to be able to hold hands and be judged by the content of their character and not the
and now she has gotten herself arrested and she doesn't see this as the moment where is all going to obama. pcs i have been arrested. she calls home, meanwhile somebody on the bus goes to tell nixon and so nixon and her husband come down to bail her out a few hours later. they go back to parks's apartment and nixon is delighted because this is the cascade she has been looking for. raymond is worried for her safety but also that the community won't stay together and back her in the long run as had happened in the coleman case but after some discussion she decides to go forward, she calls fred gray to ask him, and new, young black lawyer in town that she has been mentoring, meeting with. she calls him that night and gray then calls joanne robinson who is head of the women's political counsel when the women's political counsel that decides to act and called for a one day boycott on the mundane when parks is to be arraigned in court. in the middle of the night robinson with two students sneaks into alabama state where she is a professor and runs off 30,000 leaflets. at 3:00 a.m. robinson calls
, and president obama's rhetoric about the promise of america, life, liberty, justice, equality for all has already been forgotten by many, and i know that many people in america will not think of dr. king again until his holiday rolls around again next year. but i would like to us to pause to night and think more deeply about the meaning of dr. king's life and his legacy and what it has to teach the nation's present. it seems important to do that given that this year marks the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. 50 years have passed. 50 years have passed since kaine's voice soared over the washington monument declaring his dream. i have a dream, it is a deeply rooted in the american dream. yesterday while i was watching president obama's inaugural address i met echoes of the speech i have a dream and when i turned off my television set, i spent a few minutes reflecting are all of us truly welcome to share in this dream? most americans i sure can be cite portions of dr. king's i have a dream speech by heart. it's an extraordinary and very familiar speech i've grown accustomed to he
nothing and crazy lending standards and we just did not expand -- explore that before obama took over be clear. [laughter] [applause] . . we had john hodgman from "the daily show" who came out and helped us to it. being in a bookstore on a friday night people, okay so all of us really, all of us. i want to say the most important thing of all and it will be the most important thing i say tonight is thank you. everything i say after that we'll be will be straight downhill and i will tell you some of this is a big thank yous to the end. but we are here to talk about is the "the fifth assassin." people say what you where do you get your ideas for the book? i will tell you about this. nobody gets crazier e-mailed to me. the last time i was asked at the store for the inner circle someone brought me the holy grail. is that guy here? i have to ask first. he's not here? then let's talk about him because here's what happened. i promise you this is true. there was standing right of there and he comes up to me earlier and he is like red, do you want to see the holy grail? he had the crazy eyes go
the power jacks into its, for frederick douglass to martin luther king, to barack obama today, magnificent progress that is going forward. we changed, we are more accepting, it is still largely on their terms. the people on the other side was to accommodate. including barack obama come he can't talk about race because the voters will find some reason to be on tenterhooks about that. he can pay enormous dividends and to me it is vital that we get a sense of history with what actually happens, so we can restore our capacity to move forward. i'm not saying that it's going to be easy, but i think that it is beginning to happen. we have five years of anniversaries of things that are great lessons, not only for black people, but for those in the democracy if we understand what it is doing, and it is a vital task, whether it doesn't happen automatically, it it begins and the great thing is that it shows the promise of democracy comes when you have a movement, which means that you're actually watching where do they stand. sometimes the elected representatives will inspire you to witty response rat
. you know, it's like in today's world if president obama goes over to hawaii for four or five days, everybody goes crazy, you know? >> well, he did go, churchill took his staff with him, but when president obama goes, there's no, there's no danger in the way that there was danger of u-boats in that trip. >> sure. >> that churchill took in december, '41 is. yes? >> not really a question, but just a comment is that i was reading it, and i was getting upset at how much they were eat, and he had access to, but then you end the book with the rationing, and so it redeemed him. so i was glad you put that there, but i kind of wish it was earlier so i didn't get upset all the time. [laughter] but that was good. >> no, it was an important chapter. >> yeah, it was. >> it showed a part of churchill's character that was very important. many other people have in common. any other questions? oh, sorry. yeah. >> um, churchill was known for being a poor money manager. all of these menus that he planned and the food that he bought, did you find bills that he actually paid for everything? since he wa
nixon at 2:30 p.m. sunday. and at 7:00 p.m. rachel sworn looks at michele obama's ancestry in american tapestry. for more information on the first lady ceres visit c-span.org/firstladies. monday, booktv continues our programming with scientology, winston churchill, michele alexander on the new jim crow, max boot on guerrilla warfare, jonathan katz on haiti aide just to name a few. watch these programs and more on weekend on booktv for a complete schedule, visit booktv.org. >> if you cut demand for somebody's product per day by 50% you must have crushed prices. here is what happened. the average amount of medicare reimburses the day in a hospital has grown by 5 x since 1983. sixty% decline in the number of patients, increase in the price, we should be so lucky. i want to be in that business. there's another statistic which is entirely sort of irrelevant. hospitals tell medicare what their costs are so that medicare can compare the price they pay to hospital costs. in those 30 years that medicare increased the price by five times, hospitals reported that their costs have increased big ti
and poor out people or mayor johnson who stopped on a mugging on the street of london. even if barack obama or bush wanted to, obviously the secret service would not let them get out of limo and interfere with a mugging. it's a different kind of job as a symbolic power. ed in the end you're not surprised when a mayor you see a mayor out on the side of an accident or pulling somebody out of burning buildings. ultimately the mayor sees themselves, first of all, as a ?aib. someone solving problems it's reflected in the statistic. we know that the trust in public north in american throughout the western world and much of the world has plummeted. congress is 12 fortunate in some polls. the presidency not this president but the presidency in 309 and 0. considered wildly popular because he has 52% support right now. the supreme salter ire court numbers have goanl.name poop some would say that's a hello effect. you know the guy you know. whatever you want to call it. neighbors retalk about trust in democracy that has been largely lost elsewhere which means also our relationship to our own town and
with you. we have inauguration this week. barack obama. january 19, 2013. this very month is full of epic anniversaries regarding race in american history. a separate 150 years ago says the emancipation proclamation. by lincoln which is now popularized in the story of the 13th amendment, just to january's later in 1865. nominated for the academy award for giving a sense of that history. more pertinent, 150 years, 2013, to get a sense of how tricky this history has been, i want you to think about the 50-year anniversary. fifty years ago this january, january 1963i was getting my driver's license. that was a big deal. martin luther king was not resolved to go into birmingham this month. he decided, and he did not tell his father, and he did not tell any of his board members because the new try to stop and. what he said was, after eight years since the decision the forces defending segregation had mobilized vociferously across a segregated states than the forces of freedom, and we are about to lose our window in history, and a final take more risk than i have the way the students have been t
it was fascinating. you know, it's like a president obama goes overseas for five days, everyone goes crazy. >> yes, when president obama goes, people pay attention and we have mass media. the back then, it was december 20, 1941. >> yes? >> is not really a question but a comment. i was reading about how much they were eating and he had access to certain things in the book with a rationing. so it redeem him. i'm so glad they put that there. i kind of wish it was earlier. >> thank you. well, it was an important chapter. it showed a part of churchill's character it was very important. a part of that many other people have in common with him. are there any other questions? >> churchill was known for being an excellent entertainer. did you find bills that he paid for everything? he was kind of that famous for not paying for food and various other things in his life though. >> i don't know about that, but most of the bills that i have seen, and i have seen many of them, aren't you that they are paid. all of the important it is that he had for his son's 21st birthday, they were paid for. that is an inter
obama treated a picture of himself in the rosa parks bus in the classic pose. next week the post office will issue a stamp. she is a son of my colleagues put it, the american version of a national thing. but her legacy asks much more of us than a stanford statue. and if we are going to claim her legacy as president obama did last month, we must realize that it asks of us. rosa parks courage has the ability can make an independent stand, even though she and others had done it before and nothing had changed and even when she well understood the harm that might devolve her intimate goes over and over through the course of her life, even when the civil rights movement came certain the therese, she did not rest, they continue joining with old and new comrades to press the struggle forward, not worry what others think of this alliance is. honoring her legacy in the sending a similar courage. it requires acknowledging america's sunny post-racial society and the blighted social injustice is deep in manifests. it entails a profound recommitment to the polls she spent a lifetime fighting for. a c
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